OSPF on z/OS, basic commands

This article follows on from getting the simplest example of OSPF working. It gives the z/OS commands to display useful information.

I want to


OMP1

I configured multiple TCPIP subsystems, and each one had an OMPROUTE defined. I used a started task OEMP1, as the OMPROUTE for my base TCPIP.

If you have only one TCPIP subsystem, you can use OMPROUTE as your name.

F OMP1,OSPF,areasum

This displays the area summary.

AREA ID        AUTHENTICATION   #IFCS  #NETS  #RTRS  #BRDRS DEMAND     
0.0.0.0           NONE              2      3      3      0  OFF        

F OMP1,OSPF,EXTERNAL

EZZ7853I AREA LINK STATE DATABASE                        
TYPE LS DESTINATION     LS ORIGINATOR     SEQNO     AGE   XSUM
                # ADVERTISEMENTS:       0                     
                CHECKSUM TOTAL:         0X0                   

F OMP1,ospf,list,areas

“Displays all information concerning configured OSPF areas and their associated ranges.”

 EZZ7832I AREA CONFIGURATION 820 
 AREA ID          AUTYPE          STUB? DEFAULT-COST IMPORT-SUMMARIES? 
 0.0.0.0          0=NONE           NO          N/A           N/A 
                                                                               
 --AREA RANGES-- 
 AREA ID          ADDRESS          MASK             ADVERTISE? 
 0.0.0.0          11.11.0.0        255.255.255.0    YES 

The entry with address 11.11.0.0 comes from the omproute configuration file entry

range ip_address=11.11.0.1 
      subnet_mask=255.255.255.0 
      ; 

F OMP1,ospf,list,ifs

“For each OSPF interface, display the IP address and configured parameters as coded in the
OMPROUTE configuation file”

 EZZ7833I INTERFACE CONFIGURATION 822 
 IP ADDRESS      AREA             COST RTRNS TRDLY PRI HELLO  DEAD DB_EX 
 10.1.3.2        0.0.0.0             1     5     1   1    10    40    40 
 10.1.1.2        0.0.0.0             1     5     1   1    10    40    40 

F OMP1,ospf,list,nbma

“Displays the interface address and polling interval related to interfaces connected to nonbroadcast multiaccess networks.”

 NBMA CONFIGURATION 824 
 INTERFACE ADDR      POLL INTERVAL 
 << NONE CONFIGURED >> 

F OMP1,ospf,list,nbrs

“Displays the configured neighbors on non-broadcast networks”

 NEIGHBOR CONFIGURATION 826 
 NEIGHBOR ADDR     INTERFACE ADDRESS   DR ELIGIBLE? 
 << NONE CONFIGURED >> 

“Displays all virtual links that have been configured with this router as an endpoint.”

F OMP1,ospf,database,areaid=0.0.0.0

EZZ7853I AREA LINK STATE DATABASE                           
TYPE LS DESTINATION     LS ORIGINATOR     SEQNO     AGE   XSUM     
  1  1.2.3.4            1.2.3.4         0X80000013   61  0X3D8D    
  1  9.2.3.4            9.2.3.4         0X8000001A  393  0X5A78    
  1 @10.1.1.2           10.1.1.2        0X8000000D  286  0X9E22    
  2  10.1.0.2           1.2.3.4         0X80000006 1241  0XC35E    
  2  10.1.1.1           9.2.3.4         0X80000003  353  0X8197    
  2 @10.1.1.2           10.1.1.2        0X80000005 3600  0X64BD    
  2  10.1.3.1           9.2.3.4         0X80000003  383  0X6BAB    
  2 @10.1.3.2           10.1.1.2        0X80000005 3600  0X4ED1    

(LS) Type is described here.

  1. Router links advertisement
  2. Network link advertisement
  3. Summary link advertisement
  4. Summary ASBR advertisement
  5. Autonomous System (AS -think entire network) external link.
  • LS ORIGINATOR: Indicates the router that originated the advertisement.
  • LS DESTINATION: Indicates an IP destination (network, subnet, or host).

From the above

TYPE LS DESTINATION     LS ORIGINATOR
  2  10.1.0.2           1.2.3.4        

means router 1.2.3.4 told every one that it has the end of a network link, and its address is 10.1.0.2.

TYPE LS DESTINATION     LS ORIGINATOR      
  1  1.2.3.4            1.2.3.4

says router 1.2.3.4 told every one “here I am, router 1.2.3.4”.

You can use the type and destination in the command:

F OMP1,OSPF,LSA,LSTYPE=…,LSID=…

For example

below.

F OMP1,OSPF,LSA,LSTYPE=1,LSID=1.2.3.4

This allows you to see a lot of information about an individual element of the OSPF database.

LSTYPE=1 is for Router Links Advertisment.

The valid LSID values are given in the output of F OMP1,ospf,database,areaid=0.0.0.0 above.

F OMP1,OSPF,LSA,LSTYPE=1,LSID=9.2.3.4 
EZZ7880I LSA DETAILS  
  LS DESTINATION (ID): 9.2.3.4                     
  LS ORIGINATOR:   9.2.3.4 
  ROUTER TYPE:      (0X00)                         
  # ROUTER IFCS:   3                        
    LINK ID:          10.1.0.2        
    LINK DATA:        10.1.0.3        
    INTERFACE TYPE:   2               
    
    LINK ID:          10.1.1.2        
    LINK DATA:        10.1.1.1        
    INTERFACE TYPE:   2               
   
    LINK ID:          10.1.3.2        
    LINK DATA:        10.1.3.1        
    INTERFACE TYPE:   2 
  • LINK ID: Is the IP address of the remote end
  • LINK DATA: Is the IP address of the router’s end
  • INTERFACE TYPE: 2 is “Network links”.

F OMP1,OSPF,LSA,LSTYPE=2,LSID=10.1.0.3

This allows you to see a lot of information about an individual element of the OSPF database.

LSTYPE=2 is “Network links the set of routers attached to a network”.

The valid LSID values are given in the output of F OMP1,ospf,database,areaid=0.0.0.0 above, with type=2.

F OMP1,OSPF,LSA,LSTYPE=2,LSID=10.1.0.3                     
EZZ7880I LSA DETAILS                                   
LS OPTIONS:      E (0X02)                          
LS TYPE:         2                                 
LS DESTINATION (ID): 10.1.0.3                      
LS ORIGINATOR:   9.2.3.4                           
NETWORK MASK:    255.255.255.0                     
 ATTACHED ROUTER: 1.2.3.4          (100)    
 ATTACHED ROUTER: 9.2.3.4          (100)    

Where (100) is the metric.

F OMP1,ospf,if

 EZZ7849I INTERFACES 832 
 IFC ADDRESS     PHYS         ASSOC. AREA     TYPE   STATE  #NBRS  #ADJS 
 10.1.3.2        JFPORTCP4    0.0.0.0         BRDCST   64      1      1 
 10.1.1.2        ETH1         0.0.0.0         BRDCST   64      1      1 

F OMP1,ospf,neighbor

EZZ7851I NEIGHBOR SUMMARY 834 
 NEIGHBOR ADDR   NEIGHBOR ID     STATE  LSRXL DBSUM LSREQ HSUP IFC 
 10.1.3.1        9.2.3.4           128      0     0     0  OFF JFPORTCP4 
 10.1.1.1        9.2.3.4           128      0     0     0  OFF ETH1 

F OMP1,ospf,routers

EZZ7855I OSPF ROUTERS 836 
DTYPE RTYPE DESTINATION AREA COST NEXT HOP(S)
NONE

F OMP1,ospf,statistics

EZZ7856I OSPF STATISTICS 838 
                 OSPF ROUTER ID:         10.1.1.2 (*OSPF) 
                 EXTERNAL COMPARISON:    TYPE 2 
                 AS BOUNDARY CAPABILITY: NO 
                                                                          
 ATTACHED AREAS:                  1  OSPF PACKETS RCVD:             3336 
 OSPF PACKETS RCVD W/ERRS:        0  TRANSIT NODES ALLOCATED:         84 
 TRANSIT NODES FREED:            78  LS ADV. ALLOCATED:                1 
 LS ADV. FREED:                   1  QUEUE HEADERS ALLOC:             32 
 QUEUE HEADERS AVAIL:            32  MAXIMUM LSA SIZE:               512 
 # DIJKSTRA RUNS:                 4  INCREMENTAL SUMM. UPDATES:        0 
 INCREMENTAL VL UPDATES:          0  MULTICAST PKTS SENT:           3371 
 UNICAST PKTS SENT:               7  LS ADV. AGED OUT:                 1 
 LS ADV. FLUSHED:                 1  PTRS TO INVALID LS ADV:           0 
 INCREMENTAL EXT. UPDATES:        0 

F OMP1,OSPF,LSA,LSTYPE=2,LSID=10.1.0.3

Where

  • LSTYPE=2 is “Network links the set of routers attached to a network”.
  • 10.1.0.3 is an LS destination (from F OMP1,ospf,database,areaid=…) It comes from the frr definition below
interface eno1
   ip address 10.1.0.3 peer 10.1.0.2/24
 

Only addresses on the Server are accepted. Addresses from the Laptop are not valid.

In the command F OMP1,OSPF,LSA,LSTYPE=1,LSID=1.2.3.4, some of the LINK IDs seem to be valid.

F OMP1,OSPF,LSA,LSTYPE=1,LSID=x.x.x.x

This allows you to see a lot of information about an individual element of the OSPF database.

The LSATYPE is described in here. LSTYPE=1 is for Router Links Advertisment.

The LSID is one of the routers, for example in

  • F OMP1,ospf,database,areaid=0.0.0.0, it displays, LS DESTINATION LS ORIGINATOR
  • F OMP1,ospf,neighbor, it displays NEIGHBOR ID
F OMP1,OSPF,LSA,LSTYPE=1,LSID=9.2.3.4 
EZZ7880I LSA DETAILS  
  LS DESTINATION (ID): 9.2.3.4                     
  LS ORIGINATOR:   9.2.3.4 
  ROUTER TYPE:      (0X00)                         
  # ROUTER IFCS:   3                               
     LINK ID:          10.1.0.3               
     LINK DATA:        10.1.0.3               
        INTERFACE TYPE:   2
     LINK ID:          10.1.1.1
     LINK DATA:        10.1.1.1              
        INTERFACE TYPE:   2 
     LINK ID:          10.1.3.1              
     LINK DATA:        10.1.3.1              
        INTERFACE TYPE:   2 

F OMP1,RTTABLE

EZZ7847I ROUTING TABLE 842 
 TYPE   DEST NET         MASK      COST    AGE     NEXT HOP(S) 
                                                                        
 STAT*  10.0.0.0         FF000000  0       16079   10.1.1.2 
  SPF   10.1.0.0         FFFFFF00  101     16071   10.1.1.1         (2) 
  SPF*  10.1.1.0         FFFFFF00  1       16078   ETH1 
  SPF*  10.1.3.0         FFFFFF00  1       16078   JFPORTCP4 
  SPF   11.1.0.2         FFFFFFFF  201     4733    10.1.1.1         (2) 
                        0 NETS DELETED, 3 NETS INACTIVE 

(2) is the number of equal-cost routes to the destination.

D TCPIP,,OMPROUTE,RTTABLE,DEST=10.1.0.0

gives

EZZ7874I ROUTE EXPANSION 105                   
DESTINATION:    10.1.0.0                       
MASK:           255.255.255.0                  
ROUTE TYPE:     SPF                            
DISTANCE:       101                            
AGE:            943                            
NEXT HOP(S):    10.1.1.1          (ETH1)       
                10.1.3.1          (JFPORTCP4)  

Why is my z/OS IP address changing when using zPDT, and routing does not work?

I was looking into configuring IP V6 on my z/OS running on zPDT running on Linux. I could not understand why configuring the IP V6 link between Linux and z/OS was so difficult.

IP V6 address for use within a connection are like fe80::b0b6:daff:fe64:77f5 where b0b6:daff:fe64:77f5 is based on the MAC(hwaddr). On many systems, this value does not change across IPLs – and so most of the documentation uses the “constant” value.

The connection between Linux and z/OS is a “tap” interface (a kernel virtual device) which looks like an OSA adapter to z/OS.

I found a comment

Each TAP device has a random MAC address that is used as source address.

This explains why the connection was getting a different IP address every time I ipled.

On z/OS you defined a route using this IP address, for example

BEGINRoutes 
ROUTE 2001:db8::7/128 fe80::3f:67ff:fe08:51dc   IFPORTCP6   MTU 5000 
ENDRoutes 

To get round this problem you need to explicitly define an address on Linux

sudo ip -6 addr  add fec0::cccc/64 dev tap1

where cccc is for my initials!

You then put this address into the z/OS routing statements.

BEGINRoutes 
ROUTE 2001:db8::7/128 fe80::cccc   IFPORTCP6   MTU 5000 
ENDRoutes 

and it works first time!

IP V6 Neighbour Discovery in action

As part of understanding how IP V6 dynamic routing works, I managed to get my little home network to talk using IP V6.

Privacy

There are sites which can give you your geographic location from your IP V6 address. One site gave me the top part of my post code, the latitude and longitude of my garage, and my ISP provider. So instead of giving real IP addresses, Ive used xxxx:xxxx:xxxx:xxxx for the IP V6 address provided by my Internet Service Provider, and using the 2001:db8::/64 address which is assigned for documentation use.

My network for the easy bit

I have 2 Laptops and a Server all running Linux.

From my internet router I could see the information for LT2

  • GUA (Temporary): xxxx:xxxx:xxxx:xxxx:d539:f842:755d:8927
  • GUA (Permanent): xxxx:xxxx:xxxx:xxxx:4593:2842:db0b:4630

Where GUA is the Global address (known outside of my network).

On Linux I can use the ip -6 addr command to display the address of the connection. A connector can have more than one address.

On the server machine, the addresses were

wlxd037450ab7ac: <BROADCAST,MULTICAST,UP,LOWER_UP> mtu 1500 state UP qlen 1000
  inet6 xxxx:xxxx:xxxx:xxxx:7694:3711:8f98:7271/64 scope global temporary dynamic... 
  inet6 xxxx:xxxx:xxxx:xxxx:a5e4:61a:b3b2:9d8b/64 scope global dynamic mngtmpaddr noprefixroute ...
  inet6 fe80::216a:2b1d:c908:eb39/64 scope link noprefixroute      

Every time I rebooted, the xxxx… was the same, but the rest of the address was different.

The global address share the same prefix xxxx:xxxx:xxxx:xxxx/64, which is the address my Internet Service Provider allocated to my home.

The Link-Local fe80:: is only used within the use of its interface. The address should be stable across reboots, but may change if you change the configuration.

Talking between the Linux systems.

On LT2 I could issue ping xxxx:xxxx:xxxx:xxxx:7694:3711:8f98:7271 to the Server, and this worked.

Create your own addresses

The string xxxx:xxxx:xxxx:xxxx:7694:3711:8f98:7271 is very long, and changes every time I restart Linux. This means I had to manually type the long address in when trying to use it This was tedious for ping, and if I used ssh to logon to the box, every time it asked me about the authentication of the host.

You can create your own address for an interface.

sudo ip -6 addr add xxxx:xxxx:xxxx:xxxx::cccc dev wlxd037450ab7ac

It has to use the same 64 left bits xxxx:xxxx:xxxx:xxxx,;the remaining bits can be almost anything. I like nice short ::4 or ::cccc type values

I issued that command on the server, and I was able to successfully ping that address from my laptop. How does that work?

  • On my laptop I issued the ping command. Linux did not have any routing information for it, so it was sent using the default route to the wireless router.
  • The wireless router did not know about the address, so issued a multicast address to all(3) systems connected to it. “Does any one have xxxx:xxxx:xxxx:xxxx::cccc”.
  • Laptop1 got the request – and as it did not have the address – it ignored the request.
  • The Server got the request – and as it did have the address – it replied “I have xxxx:xxxx:xxxx:xxxx::cccc”.
  • The wireless router then forwards the ping request to the server, and cached the routing information.

If you look at the response times of the ping you can see the first request takes a long time

colinpaice@colinpaice:~$ ping  xxxx:xxxx:xxxx:xxxx::cccc
PING xxxx:xxxx:xxxx:xxxx::cccc(xxxx:xxxx:xxxx:xxxx::cccc) 56 data bytes
64 bytes from xxxx:xxxx:xxxx:xxxx::cccc: icmp_seq=1 ttl=64 time=383 ms
64 bytes from xxxx:xxxx:xxxx:xxxx::cccc: icmp_seq=2 ttl=64 time=74.5 ms
64 bytes from xxxx:xxxx:xxxx:xxxx::cccc: icmp_seq=3 ttl=64 time=6.95 ms

This information is cached on the Linux, and in the router.

For example ip -6 neigh gives

xxxx:xxxx:xxxx:xxxx::88 dev wlp4s0 lladdr 00:24:d6:5e:2e:d2 REACHABLE

After a few minutes the output is

xxxx:xxxx:xxxx:xxxx::88 dev wlp4s0 lladdr 00:24:d6:5e:2e:d2 STALE

The time for an entry to become stale is based on /proc/sys/net/ipv6/neigh/…/base_reachable_time. On my Linux system this is 30 seconds.

The above was the easy bit….

A more complex example – adding in a host without wireless access.

Laptop to z/OS

This configuration is the same as the first example with the addition of an Ethernet connection going to z/OS.

For z/OS to work with the Laptops, the wireless router needs to be told about the IP addresses on z/OS

One of the addresses for z/OS on the Ethernet-like connection from the server is 2001:db8:e::9. There are no 2a00… (xxxx…) addresses on z/OS because z/OS is not attached to the wireless network.

If I ping the 2001:db8:e::9 address from a laptop, it does not complete successfully. Looking at the traffic from the wireless router to the server, there is no traffic for 2001:db8:…

I had to use radvd on the Server to act as a router. The radvd configuration for the wireless router was

interface wlxd037450ab7ac
{
   AdvSendAdvert on;
   MaxRtrAdvInterval 60;
   MinDelayBetweenRAs  60; 
   AdvDefaultLifetime 3000;

   route 2001:db8:1::/64
   {
     AdvRoutePreference medium;
     AdvRouteLifetime 3100;
   
   };
};

The route…{} says I (the Linux system) know about this IP address range.

When this was activated, I could see a router advertisement of 2001:db8:e::/64 being sent to the wireless router. After this, there was traffic from the wireless router down to the server.

Ping to 2001:db8:1::9 on z/OS was successful. I stopped the radvd process on the server, and after about 3 minutes ping stopped working. This is because the information sent from radvd into wireless router gets stale and eventually deleted. Typically the radvd tasks sends the information regularly, so the wireless router has up to date routing information.

The source of the ping was xxxx:xxxx:xxxx:xxxx:84ce:f350:1dce:b4bf, the Laptop end of the wireless connection.

On z/OS this was routed through via the default route, xxxx:xxxx:xxxx:xxxx:84ce:f350:1dce:b4bf which was the Server end of the connection from z/OS.

The server either knew the route to my laptop, or it used the default to send it view the wireless router, which knew to send it to the laptop.

Pinging from z/OS

From z/OS I could successfully ping xxxx:xxxx:xxxx:xxxx:84ce:f350:1dce:b4bf. The request went via the z/OS default route to the server, and then via the wireless router to the laptop.

The reply (destination 2001:db8:1::9) went via the route described in laptop to z/OS above.

An even more complex example – doing it without using defaults.

I had this situation because the wireless dongle on the server was not very reliable and kept dropping the connection. This made it very hard to diagnose problem, as sometimes a ping would work – and a short while later, it would not work – and I assumed it was the configuration changes I was making.

Now that I understand more about Dynamic Routing and Neighbor Discovery, setting this up was remarkably easy. I’m sure there must be something I have missed.

z/OS setup

Define the interface

INTERFACE IFPORTCP6 
    DEFINE IPAQENET6 
    CHPIDTYPE OSD 
    PORTNAME PORTCP 
    INTFID 7:7:7:7 
                                                
INTERFACE IFPORTCP6 
    ADDADDR 2001:DB8:1::9 

Define an empty route table

You cannot define an empty routing table, so I defined a route with stupid addresses.

This means all routing addresses will be dynanic

BEGINRoutes 
;     Destination    FirstHop       LinkName  Size 
ROUTE 2999:db8::/80  2999:db8:3:0:3f57:d0f0:7e58:a7ed IFPORTCP6   MTU 5000 
ENDRoutes 

Linux Server setup

I had one radvd.conf file with a section for each interface

Interface to z/OS

interface  tap1
{
   AdvSendAdvert on; 
   MaxRtrAdvInterval 600;
   MinDelayBetweenRAs  600; 
   # make this a non default router
   AdvDefaultLifetime 0;
  # AdvDefaultLifetime 60;
  
   AdvManagedFlag  on;
   AdvOtherConfigFlag on;   
   
   prefix 2001:db8:1::/64
   {
     AdvRouterAddr on;
   };
  route 2001:db8::/64 {};
  route 2008::/64{};
};
  • AdvDefaultLifetime 0; Do not use this as a default route.
  • prefix 2001:db8:1::/64{…} use this route to get to 2001:db8:1:: range.
  • route 2001:db8::/64 {}; z/OS uses this information to build its dynamic routing.
  • route 2008::/64 {}; z/OS uses this information to build its dynamic routing.

Ethernet interface from server to the laptop

interface  eno1
{
   AdvSendAdvert on; 
   MaxRtrAdvInterval 600;
   MinDelayBetweenRAs  600;
   
   prefix 2008::/64
   {
     AdvRouterAddr on;
   };  
 
   prefix xxxx:xxxx:xxxx:xxxx::/64
   {
     AdvRouterAddr on; 
   };
   
    # I support this address range
   route 2001:db8:1::/64{};    
 
};
  • prefix 2008::/64{…} The server can use this interface to get to 2008::/64 on the laptop.
  • prefix xxxx:xxxx:xxxx:xxxx::/64 The server can use this interface to get to the wireless interface on the laptop.
  • route 2001:db8:1::/64{}; The laptop can use this information to define its dynamic routes to get to 2001:db8:1::/64 range on the server.

Wireless interface – when it worked

interface wlxd037450ab7ac
{
   AdvSendAdvert on;
   MaxRtrAdvInterval 60;
   MinDelayBetweenRAs  60; 
   AdvDefaultLifetime 3000;

   route 2001:db8:1::/64
   {
     AdvRoutePreference medium;
     AdvRouteLifetime 3100;
   
   };
};

I used this so that other devices on my home network, could get to the z/OS using the Wireless interface.

Start up script

I used

#!/bin/bash -x


sudo sysctl -w net.ipv6.conf.all.forwarding=1
sudo sysctl -w net.ipv6.conf.tap1.forwarding=1
sudo sysctl -w net.ipv6.conf.eno1.forwarding=1
sudo sysctl -w net.ipv6.conf.all.accept_ra=2
sudo sysctl -w net.ipv6.conf.tap1.accept_ra=2
sudo sysctl -w net.ipv6.conf.eno1.accept_ra=2

#kill off the running radvd agent
ps ax |grep radvd |grep -v grep |awk '{print $1 }'|sudo xargs kill  -9
ps -A |grep radvd

sudo ip -6 neigh flush all 
sudo ip -6 route flush root 2001:db8:1::/64
sudo ip -6 -statistics route flush proto ra 

# restart the radvd agent 
sudo rm /var/log/radvd.log
sudo radvd -d 5 -l /var/log/radvd.log -m logfile  -C $p
sleep 1
less /var/log/radvd.log

Although I had specified

sudo sysctl -w net.ipv6.conf.all.accept_ra=2

This did not seem to work (bug?), and I had to explicitly set

sudo sysctl -w net.ipv6.conf.tap1.accept_ra=2
sudo sysctl -w net.ipv6.conf.eno1.accept_ra=2

Laptop setup

Define a short address on the laptop.

sudo ip -6 addr add 2008::5 dev enp0s31f6

And that’s almost it.

There was a tiny little complication.

Usually when I used ping on my laptop, it used the IP address I had created, 2008::5. I could see this in the Wireshark trace going to z/OS. When playing around with the wireless adapter, sometimes ping used the wireless address, and the ping failed, because z/OS did not know how to route back to the wireless address. Ping gave me a warning Warning: source address might be selected on device other than: enp0s31f6.

I fixed this by creating a

route xxxx:xxxx:xxxx:xxxx::/64{}

in the tap1 configuration for z/OS

and a

prefix xxxx:xxxx:xxxx:xxxx::/64{…}

statement for the eno1 interface to the laptop.

How to change and delete network routing

This blog post arose when trying to document IP V6 routing. The behaviour did not work as expected.

Static routes

Linux

On Linux, you can use command like

sudo ip -6 route add 2001:0db8:1::9/64 dev tap1
sudo ip -6 route del 2001:0db8:1::9/64 dev tap1
sudo ip -6 route flush 2001:0db8:1::9/64 dev tap1
sudo ip -6 -statistics route flush 2001:0db8:1::9/64 dev tap1

Some information may be stored in the neighbour cache so you may need to use commands like:

sudo ip -6 neigh flush to 2001:db8:1::9
sudo ip -6 neigh flush dev tap1

z/OS

You define static routes between BEGINRoutes and ENDRoutes. If you want to change one entry, you have to replace all entries. You cannot add or remove individual entries.

You cannot have an empty BEGINRoute… ENDRoute. If used, it has to have at least one entry. You can create a dummy entry that will never be used.

You can change this file, and use the OBEY command to activate it

v tcpip,tcpip,obeyfile,USER.Z24C.TCPPARMS(routefc)

To delete an entry, remove it from the file, and activate the file.

Dynamic routes

Dynamic routes are created from facilities like radvd on Linux. This defines capability available on an interface.

For example

interface  tap1
{
   AdvSendAdvert on; 
   AdvDefaultLifetime 60;

   prefix 2001:db8:1::/64
   {
   };
   route 2001:db8::/64 {AdvRouteLifetime 1800};
   route 2008::/64{ AdvRouteLifetime 600};
};

At the Linx(sender)

  • it creates an internal address(fe80::…) for the tap1 interface
  • it create a route saying to get to 2001:db8::1/64 route it over the tap1 interface.

At the remote end, it receives a Router Advertisement packet. This includes

  • The IP address of tap1 at the Linux end (created above)
  • Route statements which have
    • The address range
    • The route lifetime.

From this, the remote end creates a dynamic route for every route in the packet.

How to change a dynamic route

Change the radvd configuration file, then either

  • cancel and restart ravd
    • ps ax |grep radvd |grep -v grep |awk ‘{print $1 }’|sudo xargs kill -9
    • sudo radvd -d 5 -l /var/log/radvd.log -m logfile -C radvd.conf
  • send a SIGHUP (sudo kill -s HUP <pid> )

The route expires after AdvRouteLifetime seconds. For the route to remain current, there needs to be a regular Router Advertisement message.

Displaying a dynamic route

On Linux ip -6 route gave me (for one of the dynamic routes) for one entry

2008::/64 dev eno1 proto ra metric 100 pref medium
2008::/64 dev eno1 proto kernel metric 256 expires 86293sec pref medium

Where 86293sec is just under 1 day.

On z/OS you can display this dynamic routing information using the TSO NETSTAT ROUTE RADV DETAIL command.

Example output

DestIP:   2008::/64 
  Gw:     fe80::8024:bff:fe45:840c 
  Intf:   IFPORTCP6  MTU:  0 
  Metric: 00000002   LifetimeExp: 12/20/2022 12:32 
  GwReachable:  Yes  IntfActive:  Yes 

This shows there is an entry for 2008::/64, and it is due to expire at 20th December 2022 at 12:32.

How do I delete a dynamically created route?

You have several ways

  • Remove it from the radvd configuraton file. Restart radvd, and let the definition expire – possibly hours later.
  • On Linux, remove the entry from the config file, restart radvd, use route delete….
  • Cause it to expire earlier
    • Edit the configuration file
    • Set AdvRouteLifetime to a low value like 10 seconds,
    • Restart the radvd agent. This sends the RA message to the remote system, and sets the expiry time of the one of interest,
    • Delete the route from the config file,
    • Restart the radvd agent again. This sends the RA which will not have the route.

The information may still be in the neighbourhood cache, and this may need to be flushed.

Creating a default router

For the interface statement, set a default life time > 0. A value of 0 says this is not a default router.

interface  tap1
{  
   AdvSendAdvert on;
   AdvDefaultLifetime 0;
...

To remove the default router, set AdvDefaultLifetime to 0; and redeploy.

If there is a static definition for the default route, this will be used in preference to the dynamically defined router.

What does tso netstat neighbour give you?

The command TSO NETSTAT ND gave me

Query Neighbor cache for 2001:db8:1:0:8024:bff:fe45:840c 
  IntfName: IFPORTCP6          IntfType: IPAQENET6 
  LinkLayerAddr: 82240B45840C  State: Reachable 
  Type: Router                 AdvDfltRtr: No 

Query Neighbor cache for fe80::8024:bff:fe45:840c 
  IntfName: IFPORTCP6          IntfType: IPAQENET6 
  LinkLayerAddr: 82240B45840C  State: Reachable 
  Type: Router                 AdvDfltRtr: No 

Query Neighbor cache for fe80::9863:1eff:fe13:1408 
  IntfName: JFPORTCP6          IntfType: IPAQENET6 
  LinkLayerAddr: 9A631E131408  State: Reachable 
  Type: Router                 AdvDfltRtr: No 

On Linux the

ip -6 addr

command gave me

tap1: <BROADCAST,MULTICAST,UP,LOWER_UP> mtu 1500 state UNKNOWN qlen 1000
    inet6 2001:db8:1:0:b0fd:f92b:8362:577b/64 ...
    inet6 2001:db8:1:0:8024:bff:fe45:840c/64 ...
    inet6 fe80::8024:bff:fe45:840c/64 ...

tap2: <BROADCAST,MULTICAST,UP,LOWER_UP> mtu 1500 state UNKNOWN qlen 1000
    inet6 fe80::9863:1eff:fe13:1408/64 ...

The TSO output means

  • Query Neighbor cache for 2001:db8:1:0:8024:bff:fe45:840c. The address is one of the addresses on the remote end of the connection. There is an entry because some traffic came via the address.
  • IntfName: IFPORTCP6 The z/OS Interface name used to create the defintion
  • IntfType: IPAQENET6 the OSA-Express QDIO interfaces statement
  • LinkLayerAddr: 82240B45840C
  • State: Reachable Other options can include stale, which means z/OS has not heard anything from this address for a while
  • Type: Router
  • AdvDfltRtr: No. The information passed in the Router Advertisement, said this was connection does not Advertise a Default Router(AdvDfltRtr).

From the NETSTAT ND output we can see data has been received from

  • IFPORTCP6:2001:db8:1:0:8024:bff:fe45:840c
  • IFPORTCP6:fe80::8024:bff:fe45:840c
  • JFPORTCP6:fe80::9863:1eff:fe13:1408

To get data to flow down the 2001…. address I had to use

ping -I 2001:db8:1:0:8024:bff:fe45:840c 2001:db8:1::9

Where the -I says use the interface address.

You can get information about bytes processed by interface (not by address) using the TSO NETSTAT DEVLINKS command.

Why has my packet suddenly decided to go over there? Grrr

As one of the many problems I had trying to get IPV6 routing to work, I found that I could run a configuration script, and it would all work successfully (including a ping) – then a few seconds later, a manual ping would not work.

I had a shell script to display all my IP configuration information, to display the route information all in one line… including

option="-6 -o"
echo "==ROUTE"
ip $option route  |awk '{ print "ROUTE", $0 } '

When it worked, my route was

ROUTE ::1 dev lo proto kernel metric 256 pref medium
ROUTE 2001:db8::/64 dev enp0s31f6 proto ra metric 100 pref medium
ROUTE 2001:db8::/64 dev enp0s31f6 proto kernel metric 256 expires 86395sec pref medium
ROUTE 2001:db99::/64 dev enp0s31f6 proto ra metric 100 pref medium
ROUTE 2a00:23c5:978f:6e01::/64 dev wlp4s0 proto ra metric 600 pref medium
ROUTE fe80::/64 dev enp0s31f6 proto kernel metric 100 pref medium
ROUTE fe80::/64 dev wlp4s0 proto kernel metric 600 pref medium
ROUTE default via fe80::966a:b0ff:fe85:54a7 dev wlp4s0 proto ra metric 600 pref medium
ROUTE default via fe80::a2f0:9936:ddfd:95fa dev enp0s31f6 proto ra metric 1024 expires 132sec hoplimit 64 pref medium
ROUTE default via fe80::a2f0:9936:ddfd:95fa dev enp0s31f6 proto ra metric 20100 pref medium

Some interesting information in this display (see the man page here)

ROUTE 2001:db8::/64 dev enp0s31f6 proto ra metric 100 pref medium
  • 2001:db8::/64, this is the prefix of length 64 bits so 2001:db8:0:0. It is the address range 2001:0db8:0000:0000…. where …. is 0000:0000:0000:0000 to ffff:ffff:ffff:ffff
  • dev enp0s31f6 is the device (also known as the interface)
  • proto ra. The protocol was installed by Router Discovery protocol
  • metric 100. When there is a choice of valid routes, the lower the metric, the more it is favoured.
  • pref medium. Preference medium (out of high, medium, low).

Another interesting one is

ROUTE default via fe80::a2f0:9936:ddfd:95fa dev enp0s31f6 proto ra metric 20100 pref medium
  • If no other routes are found use the default, route, via enp0s31f6, installed by router discovery protocol(ra).
  • The metric is 20100 – so a low priority value.

A short while later, when ping failed, there was an additional route

ROUTE default via fe80::966a:b0ff:fe85:54a7 dev wlp4s0 proto ra metric 600 pref medium

With this the metric is 600 – which is lower than 20100 from before, so packets were sent to the wireless interface – which did not know what to do with them, and dropped them!

Solution

I used

sudo ip -6 route replace default via fe80::a2f0:9936:ddfd:95fa dev enp0s31f6 proto ra metric 200 pref medium

where the metric value was lower than the metric value for the wireless connection, and ping worked.

The above solution worked, but the IP v6 address changed from day to day. The following worked better as it has a permanent global address.

sudo ip -6 route replace default via 2001:db8::2 dev enp0s31f6 proto ra metric 200  pref medium

where 2001:db8::2 is the IP address of the connection on the remote, server, machine. This was done using

sudo ip addr add 2001:db8::2/64 dev eno1

Getting IP v6 static routing from Linux to/from z/OS

For me this was an epic journey, taking weeks to get working. It was like a magical combination lock, which will not open unless all of the parameters are correct, today has an ‘r’ in the month, and you are standing on one leg. Once you know the secrets, it is easy.

With IP V6 there is a technology called dynamic discovery which is meant to make configuring your IP network much easier. Each node asks the adjacent nodes what IP addresses they have, and so your connection to the next box magically works. I could not get this to work, and thought I would do the simpler task of static configuration – this had similar problems – but they were smaller problems.

There were two three four five six seven key things that were needed to get ping to work in my setup:

The key things

Allow forwarding between interfaces

On Linux

sudo sysctl -w net.ipv6.conf.all.forwarding=1

The documentation says “… conf/all/forwarding – Enable global IPv6 forwarding between all interfaces”.

Clearing the cache

Routing and neighbourhood definitions are cached for a period. If you change a definition, and activate it, an old definition may still be used. I found I got different results if I rebooted, re-ipled, or went for a cup of tea; it worked – then next time I tried it with the same definitions, it did not work. Clearing the routing and neighbourhood cache made it more consistent.

On z/OS use V TCPIP,,PURGECACHE,IFPORTCP6

On Linux use sudo ip -6 neigh flush all

Put a delay between creating definitions and using them.

I had a 2 second delay between creating a definition, and using it, which helped getting it to work. I think data is propagated between the system, and issuing a ping or other command immediately after a definition, was too fast for it,

A timing window

I had scripts to clear and redefine the definitions. Some times if I ran the laptop script then the server script, then ping would not work. If I reran the laptop script, then usually ping worked. Sometimes I had to rerun the server script.

The default route would often change.

The wireless connection to the server was unreliable. There would be a route from my laptop to the server via the wireless. Then a few minutes later the connection to the server would stop, and so alternate routes had to be used, because traffic via the wireless would be dropped.

I got around this problem, by explicit coding of the routes and not needing to use the default definitions. (Also disabled the wireless connection while debugging)

The correct route syntax

I found I was getting “Neigbor Solicitation” instead of the static routing. To prevent this the route on the laptop needed the via…

sudo ip -6 route add 2001:db8:1::9/128 via 2001:db8::2 dev enp0s31f6

and not

sudo ip -6 route add 2001:db8:1::9/128                dev enp0s31f6

See Is “via” needed when creating a Linux IP route?

The z/OS IP address kept changing across IPLs

Why is my z/OS IP address changing when using zPDT, and routing does not work?

Configuration

  • The laptop had an Ethernet connection to the server.
  • The server had an Ethernet like connection to z/OS. This was a tunnel(tap1), looking like an OSA to z/OS

The addresses:

Laptop Ethernet (enp0s31f6)2001:db8:::7
Server Ethernet (eno1)2001:db8:::2
Server Tunnel (tap1)2001:db8:1::3
Z/OS interface (ifacecp6)2001:db1::9

The Laptop side had prefix 2001:db8:0::/64, the z/OS side had prefix 2001:db8:1::/64 . See One minute topic: Understanding IP V6 addressing and routing if these numbers look strange.

Definitions

z/OS routing definitions

BEGINRoutes 
;     Destination      FirstHop          LinkName   Size 
ROUTE default6         2001:db8:99::3    IF2        MTU  1492
ROUTE 2001:db8:99::/64 2001:db8:99::3    IF2        MTU 5000 

ROUTE 2001:db8::/64    2001:db8:1::3     IFPORTCP6  MTU 5000 
ROUTE 2001:db8:1::/64  2001:db8:1::3     IFPORTCP6  MTU 5000 
                                                                              
ENDRoutes 

Where

  • default6 says if no other routes match, then send the traffic down IF2 connection. At the remote end of the IF2 connection, it has IP address 2001:db8:99::3.
  • Traffic for 2001:db8:99::/64 should be sent down interface IF2 – which has an address 2001:db8:99::3 at the remote end
  • Traffic for 2001:db8::/64 (2001:db8:0::/64) should be sent down interface IFPORTCP6 which has address 2001:db8:1::3 at the remote end.
  • Traffic for 2001:db8:1::/64 should be sent down interface IFPORTCP6 which has address 2001:db8:1::3 at the remote end.

I needed a route for both 2001:db8::/64 and 2001:db8:1::/64 as one was the route to the laptop, the other was the route to the Linux server.

Linux Server machine

On my Linux machine I had

from ip -6 addr

tap1: <BROADCAST,MULTICAST,UP,LOWER_UP> mtu 1500 state UNKNOWN qlen 1000
 inet6 2001:db8:1::3/64 scope global 
    valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
 inet6 2001:db8::3/64 scope global 
    valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
 inet6 fe80::e852:31ff:fe0f:81da/64 scope link 
    valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever

I used the global address 2001:db8:1::3 in my z/OS routing statement.

The documentation implies I should use the link-local address fe80::e852:31ff:fe0f:81da in my static z/OS definitions, but I could not see how to use this, as it changed every time I ipled my z/OS. This means I need to explicitly define an address on Linux for this connection ( 2001:db8:1::3).

Linux Server definitions

On my Linux server I defined static definitions.

sudo sysctl -w net.ipv6.conf.all.forwarding=1

# clear the state every time
sudo ip -6 route flush root 2001:db8:1::/64
sudo ip -6 route flush root 2001:db8::/64
sudo ip -6 neigh flush all 

# define the interface to z/OS
sudo ip -6 addr del 2001:db8:1::3/64 dev tap1
sudo ip -6 addr add 2001:db8:1::3/64 dev tap1

sudo ip -6 addr del 2001:db8::2/64 dev eno1
sudo ip -6 addr add 2001:db8::2/64 dev eno1


sudo ip -6 route del 2001:db8::/64 dev eno1
sudo ip -6 route add 2001:db8::/64 dev eno1

sudo ip -6 route del 2001:db8:1::9 dev tap1
sudo ip -6 route add  2001:db8:1::/64   dev tap1

# sudo traceroute -d -m 2 -n -q 1 -I    2001:db8::7 
# ping 2001:db8::7 -c 1 -r
# ping 2001:db8:1::9 -c 1 -r

This script grew as I added all of the options to get it to work.

The statements are

sudo sysctl -w net.ipv6.conf.all.forwarding=1

This enables the cross interface traffic.

sudo ip -6 route flush root 2001:db8:1::/64
sudo ip -6 route flush root 2001:db8::/64
sudo ip -6 neigh flush all

These clear the routing for the two addresses, and for the neighbourhood cache. I do not know if these are required, without them the results were not consistent.

#give the interface to z/OS an explicit address
sudo ip -6 addr del 2001:db8:1::3/64 dev tap1
sudo ip -6 addr add 2001:db8:1::3/64 dev tap1


#give the connection to the Laptop an explicit address
sudo ip -6 addr del 2001:db8::2/64 dev eno1
sudo ip -6 addr add 2001:db8::2/64 dev eno1

These deleted then created global addresses for the server end of the interfaces.

sudo ip -6 route del 2001:db8::/64 dev eno1
sudo ip -6 route add 2001:db8::/64 dev eno1


sudo ip -6 route del 2001:db8:1:: dev tap1
sudo ip -6 route add 2001:db8:1:: dev tap1

These deleted and created routes the traffic to the interfaces. I could have used route rep…

Linux Laptop definitions

#Give the ethernet connection to the server an explicit address
sudo ip -6 addr add 2001:db8::19 dev enp0s31f6

#create the route to the server using the via
sudo ip -6 route del 2001:db8:1::/64 dev enp0s31f6
sudo ip -6 route add 2001:db8:1::/64 via 2001:db8::2 dev enp0s31f6

I needed to specify

  • an explicit to the address of the interface to the server, so it could be used as a destination from z/OS.
  • the route to get to the server. I needed to specify the via, so the static route was used directly. Without the via, it tried to use Neighbourhood discovery.

Pinging

For “ping” to work, the packet has to reach the destination and the reply get back to the originator. See Understanding ping and why it does not answer.

If I pinged 2001:db8:1::9 (z/OS) from the Linux server (the end of the IFPORTCP6 connection) the traffic came from address 2001:db8:1::3, The reply was sent back using the matching 2001:db8:1::/64 definitions.

If I pinged 2001:db8:1::9 (z/OS) from my laptop, through the Linux server to z/OS, the traffic came from address 2001:db8::7. The reply was sent back using the matching 2001:db8::/64 definitions.

If I pinged 2001:db8::7 (laptop) from z/OS it was sent back using the matching 2001:db8::/64 definitions.

Understanding radvd with IPV6 on Linux.

My two day project to deploy IP V6 dynamic routing, turned into an eight week project before I got it to work.

I am documenting a lot of what I learned – today’s experience is understanding what radvd is and what the configuration options mean. I found a lot of documentation – most of which either assumed you know a lot, or only provided an incomplete description.

High level view of what radvd provides

There are several ways of providing configuration to TCPIP. One way is using radvd (on Linux).

In a configuration file you give

  • An interface name
    • Which IP addresses (and address ranges) are available at the remote end of the connection.
    • Which IP addresses (and address ranges) are available at the local end of the connection

From the information about the local end, the remote end can build its routing tables.

Background IP routing

With IP you can have

  • static routing, where you explicitly give the routes to a destination – such as to get to a.b.c.d – go via xyz interface. You have to do a lot of administration defining the addresses of each end of an interface (think Ethernet cable)
  • dynamic routing, and neighbourhood discovery, where the system automatically finds the neighbours and there is less work for an administrator to do.

With IPv6 you have

  • global addresses with IP addresses like 2001:db8:1:16…..
  • link-local addresses. These are specific to an interface. An Ethernet connection can have many terminals hanging off ‘the bus’. The link-local address is only used within the connection. A different Ethernet cable can use the same address. There is no problem as the addresses are only used with the cable.
  • Neighbour Discovery. Rather than specify every thing as you do with static routing, IP V6 supports Neighbour Discovery, where each node can tell connected nodes, what routes and IP addresses it knows about. This is documented in the specification. This supports
    • Router Advertisement (RA), (“Hello, I’m a router, I know about the following addresses and routes”),
    • Router Solicitation (RS), (“Hello, I’ve just started up, are there any routers out there?”),
    • Neighbour Solicitation(NS) (“Does anyone have this IP address?”), and
    • Neighbour Advertisement (Usually in response to a Neighbour Solicitation, “I have this address”).

What is radvd?

The radvd program is a Router Advertisment Daemon (RADvd) which provides fakes router information – but is not a router.

You specify a configuration file. The syntax is defined here.

You can specify that this interface provides a “default” route. See here.

Example definition

I have a Linux Server, and a laptop running Linux connected by an Ethernet cable.

For the server, the radvd.conf file has

# define the ethernet connection
interface  eno1
{
   AdvSendAdvert on; 
   MaxRtrAdvInterval 60;
   MinDelayBetweenRAs  60; 
   
   prefix 2001:ccc::/64 
   {
   #     AdvOnLink on;
   #     AdvAutonomous on;
     AdvRouterAddr on; 
   };
  
   route 2001:ff99::/64
   {
   #   AdvRoutePreference medium;
   # 3600 = 1 hour
      AdvRouteLifetime 3600;
   
   };
};

The key information is

Comments

Data following #

The name of the interface

interface eno1{….};

prefix statement

prefix 2001:ccc::/64{…}

2001:ccc::/64 is the ipv6 address range or, to say it another way, ipv6 addresses with the left 64 bits beginning with 2001:0ccc:0000:0000. In IP V6 this is known as the prefix.

Basically this prefix statement means “this interface is a route to the specified prefix”.

This creates some addresses on the server for the connection.

eno1    inet6 2001:ccc::e02a:943b:3642:1d73/64 scope global temporary dynamic...       
eno1    inet6 2001:ccc::dbf:5c90:61a6:20ae/64 scope global dynamic mngtmpaddr...
eno1    inet6 2001:ccc::c48b:e8f1:495c:5b52/64 scope global temporary dynamic ...       
eno1    inet6 2001:ccc::2d8:61ff:fee9:312a/64 scope global dynamic mngtmpaddr ...

create routes

The prefix statement creates a route on the server to get to the laptop

2001:ccc::/64 dev eno1 proto ra metric 100 pref medium
2001:ccc::/64 dev eno1 proto kernel metric 256 ...

This says that on the server, if there is a request for an address in the range 2001:ccc::/64 send it via device eno1.

route 2001:ff99::/64 statement.

This passes information to the remote end of the connection, see below. It says “I (the server) know how to route to 2001:ff99::/64”.

It the routing address does not show up in any ip -6 commands on the server.

Polling

The radvd code periodically sends information along the connection to the other end, at an interval you specify. See radvdump below on how to display it.

At the other end of the connection…

At the remote (laptop) end of the connection, using WiresShark to display the data received, shows a Router Advertisement with

Internet Protocol Version 6, Src: fe80::a2f0:9936:ddfd:95fa, Dst: ff02::1
Internet Control Message Protocol v6
    Type: Router Advertisement (134)
    ...
    ICMPv6 Option (Prefix information : 2001:ccc::/64)
    ICMPv6 Option (Route Information : Medium 2001:ff99::/64)
    ICMPv6 Option (Source link-layer address : 00:d8:61:e9:31:2a)

Where

  • fe80::a2f0:9936:ddfd:95fa is the link-local address on the server machine
  • ff02::1 the multicast address “All nodes” on a link (link-local scope)”
  • Prefix information : 2001:ccc::7/64 the prefix of the IP address 2001:ccc:0:0…
  • Route Information : Medium 2001:ff99::/64 This is from the “route” in the radvd configuration file on the Linux Server. It tells the laptop that this connection knows about routing to 2001:ccc::/64 .

From the route information it dynamically creates a route on the laptop to the server.

2001:ff99::/64 via fe80::a2f0:9936:ddfd:95fa dev enp0s31f6 proto ra metric 100 ...

This creates a route to 2001:ff99::/64 via the IP address fe80::….95fa, from the laptop end of the Ethernet connection with name enp0s31f6 to where-ever the connection goes to (in this example it goes to my server).

If I ping 2001:ffcc::9 from the laptop, it will use this route on its way to the z/OS server.

Connection to z/OS

Within the radvd.conf file is the definition to get to z/OS. This interface looks like an Ethernet (the ip -6 link command gives link/ether). This is for a different radvd configuration file to the earlier example.

interface  tap1
{
   AdvSendAdvert on; 
   MaxRtrAdvInterval 60;
   MinDelayBetweenRAs  60; 
   AdvManagedFlag  on;
   AdvOtherConfigFlag on;
   
   prefix 2001:db8:1::/64
   {
     AdvOnLink on;
     AdvAutonomous on;
     AdvRouterAddr on;
    
   };
   prefix 2001:db8:1::99/128
   {
     AdvOnLink on;
     AdvAutonomous on;
     AdvRouterAddr on;
    
   };

   route 2001:db8::/64
   {
     AdvRoutePreference medium;
     AdvRouteLifetime 3100;
   
   };
};

This says there are IP addresses in the range 2001:db8:1::/64 via this connection. z/OS reads the Router Advertisement and creates a route for them. TSO Netstat route gives

DestIP:   2001:db8:1::/64 
  Gw:     :: 
  Intf:   IFPORTCP6         Refcnt:  0000000000 
  Flgs:   UD                MTU:     9000 

The explicit IP address, with the 128 to specify use the whole value, rather than just the prefix,

 prefix 2001:db8:1::99/128
   {
     AdvOnLink on;
     AdvAutonomous on;
     AdvRouterAddr on;    
   };

creates a route in z/OS; from TSO NETSTAT ROUTE

DestIP:   2001:db8:1::99/128 
  Gw:     :: 
  Intf:   IFPORTCP6         Refcnt:  0000000000 
  Flgs:   UHD               MTU:     9000 

In UHD, the U says the interface is Up, the H says this is for a host (a specific end point), and the D says this is dynamically created.

If you try to ping 2001:db8:1::99 from the server, a Neighbour Solicitation request is sent from the server to z/OS, asking “do you have 2001:db8:1:99?”. My z/OS did not have that defined and so did not respond.

When I defined this address on z/OS TCPIP using the obeyfile

INTERFACE IFPORTCP6  DELETE 
INTERFACE IFPORTCP6 
    DEFINE IPAQENET6 
    CHPIDTYPE OSD 
    PORTNAME PORTCP 
    INTFID 7:7:7:7 
                                             
INTERFACE IFPORTCP6 
    ADDADDR 2001:DB8:1::9 
INTERFACE IFPORTCP6 
    ADDADDR 2001:DB8:9::9 
INTERFACE IFPORTCP6 
    ADDADDR 2001:DB8:1::99 

(And used

  • v tcpip,,sto,ifportcp6
  • v tcpip,,obeyfile,USER.Z24C.TCPPARMS(IFACE61)
  • v tcpip,,sta,ifportcp6

to activate it)

After this, the ping was successful because there was a neighbour solicitation for 2001:db8:1::99, and z/OS replied with Neighbour Advertisement of 2001:db8:1::9 saying I have it.

Create a default route

If you specify AdvDefaultLifetime 0 on the interface, this indicates that the router is not a default router and should not appear on the default router list in the Router Advertiser broadcasts. If the value is non zero, the recipient, can use this connection as a default route, for example there is no existing default route. A statically defined default will be used in preference to a dynamically defined one.

Use radvdump to display what it sent in the RA

You can use sudo radvdump to display what is being sent in the Router Advertiser message broadcast over multicast. It looks just like the radvd.conf file.

Is “via” needed when creating a Linux IP route?

To get static routing working I needed a route like one of

# specific destination
sudo ip -6 route add fc:1::9/128 via fc::2 dev enp0s31f6r
sudo ip -6 route add fc:1::9/128  via fc::2 
#range of addresses
sudo ip -6 route add fc:1::/64 via fc::2  dev enp0s31f6
sudo ip -6 route add fc:1::/64 via fc::2 

If I a route without the via

sudo ip -6 route add fc:1::9/128 dev enp0s31f6

then it ignored my static routing and did Neighbor Solicitation; it asked adjacent systems if they had knew about the IP address fc:1::9. This is an IP V6 Neighbour Discovery facility.

There were hints around the internet that if the next hop address is not specified, then the “next hop router” will try to locate the passed address.

So the short answer to the question is: “yes. You should specify it when using static routing”.