How to administer AMS policies, and use the set policy command.

I had been using the setmqspl command (on z/OS and midrange) to manage my AMS policies. This command has the drawback that if you want to change a policy, for example add a new recipipient, you had to specify the whole command. Jon Rumsey pointed out the mid range MQSC commands “set policy” and “display policy” which allow you to add, delete, or replace; recipients and signers.

Examples of midrange runmqsc set policy command

Exporting parameters

If you want to keep a copy of the AMS definitions you can use display policy command, but this gives output like RECIP(CN=BBB,C=GB), without quotes. The set policy command needs the value within single quotes. The dmpmqcfg command does not support AMS policies.

To be able to capture the output so you can reuse it, you need to use the dspmqspl -export command. This gives output like

setmqspl -m QMA -p ABC -s SHA512 -e AES256 -r “CN=BBB,C=GB” -c 0 -t 0

This gives the parameters if a format that can be used directly.

Add or remove recipients or signers

Using runmqsc define a policy using the default action(replace)

set policy(ABC) signalg(SHA512) recip(‘CN=AAA,C=GB’)  ENCALG(AES256) 

You can add a new recipient

set policy(ABC) signalg(SHA512) recip(‘CN=BBB,C=GB’) ENCALG(AES256) action(ADD)

You can now display it

DIS policy (ABC)

AMQ9086I: Display IBM MQ Advanced Message Security policy details.
POLICY(ABC) SIGNALG(SHA512)
ENCALG(AES256)
RECIP(CN=BBB,C=GB)
RECIP(CN=AAA,C=GB)
KEYREUSE(DISABLED)
ENFORCE

You can delete a recipient

set policy(ABC) SIGNALG(SHA256) ENCALG(AES128) RECIP(‘CN=AAA,C=GB’) action(remove)

and display it

DIS policy(Abc)
AMQ9086I: Display IBM MQ Advanced Message Security policy details.
POLICY(ABC) SIGNALG(SHA512)
ENCALG(AES256) RECIP(CN=BBB,C=GB)


KEYREUSE(DISABLED)
ENFORCE

You have to specify SIGNALG and/or ENCALG each time, but for action(REMOVE|ADD) it can have any valid value (except NONE). The value is only used when ACTION(REPLACE) is used, or ACTION() is omitted. The following will add the recipient, and not change the signalg or encalg values.

set policy(ABC) recip(‘CN=CCC,C=GB’) action(ADD) signalg(MD5) encalg(RC2)

You can specify multiple RECIP

set policy(ABC) signalg(SHA512) recip(‘CN=BBB,C=GB’) recip(‘CN=DDD,C=GB’) ENCALG(AES256) action(ADD)

or multiple signers

set policy(ABC) signalg(SHA512) signer(‘CN=BBB,C=GB’) signer(‘CN=DDD,C=GB’) ENCALG(AES256) action(ADD)

or multiple signers and recipients.

Changing other parameters

If want to change an algorithm, the tolerate|enforce that every message must be protected, or the key reuse, then you must use the action(replace), and specify all the parameters, so it might be easier to use setmqspl -m … -policy … -export, and output it to a file, then modify the file.

Administering AMS on z/OS

On z/OS (and mid-range) you have dspmqspl and setmqspl commands. With the setmqspl command, you replace the entire statement.

It is good practice to have a PDSE with all of your definitions in, one member per policy, or perhaps all policies in one member – depending on how many policies you have. If you have a problem with your queue manager, you have a copy of the definitions.

Another good practice is to take a copy of a definition before you make the change (and keep it unchanged), so you can roll back to it if you need to undo a change.

You can use the export command, to output all policies, or a selected policy. You can have this going into a sequential data set or a PDSE member. You might want to have two copies,

  1. The before image – from before the change
  2. The copy you update.

Of course you could always use the previous copy, but you cannot tell if someone has updated the definitions outside of your change control system, so taking a copy of the existing definitions is a good idea. You could always compare the previous copy, with the copy you just created to check there were no unauthorised changes.

You may want to make the same change to multiple queue managers, so having updates in a PDSE member is a good way of doing it. Just change the queue manager name and rerun the job.

On z/OS, remember to use the refresh command on the AMS address space for it to pick up any changes.

Other AMS blog posts

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